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Why I Think You Should Go to College Right After High School

Recently, a PI Girl asked if anyone had ever started college later than others. She is 21 and a college freshman, and wanted to see if there were some PI Girls who could relate.

While many people start college straight from high school, some think life can be more enriching by getting actual experience like traveling the world, studying abroad independently or even just working to save money.

[Source: http://www.nbcnews.com/business/business-news/back-school-older-students-rise-college-classrooms-n191246]

Here are some other reasons why people start college later in life: They start a family, start their own business, or join the military.

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, students who enroll later after high school (instead of right away) are at risk to not complete their college degree.

Students who delay enrollment for a long period of time are likely to enroll to advance in or change their careers. For whatever reasons students wait to enroll in college, those who do delay are at considerable risk of not completing a postsecondary credential when compared with their peers who enroll immediately after high school graduation…”

An article from the Los Angeles Times explained that we grow in our 20s so much, and it’s a very vital developmental season for our life choices and where we will end up by the time we are in our 30s and so forth. Many people are saying that “30 is the new 20,” but it’s important, according to some sources, that you get your degree so you’re able to pay your mortgage and bills and be settled to be able to have a family in a secure manner.

Consider this: About two-thirds of lifetime wage growth happens during the first 10 years of a career, with the biggest gains coming from job-hopping or earning advanced degrees before marriage, family and mortgages take hold. Even the underemployed can take heart in knowing that wage losses disappear by about age 30, if they move through post-college jobs and degrees strategically.”

Although there are many reasons to delay going to college straight after high school, I want to share with you at least 10 reasons why you should go to college right away, even if it’s straight to a junior college. I think that going from high school straight to a four-year school is ideal and will push you into your career quicker, but it’s really different for each student. Personally, I decided to go to a junior college and took my time deciding which school I wanted to transfer to. I decided to go to a university around the same age that this PI Girl decided to go to college, but I had my AA degree under my belt and was going in the direction I wanted to go. If you’re really accomplishing something that is pertinent to your future career or family life, then I would say wait, but otherwise, seriously, it’s wise to go right after high school.

 

10 Reasons to Go to College Right After High School

1. If you don’t go to college, you will miss out on a large salary: The Huffington Post reported that those who skip out on college will lose out on $800,000 over a lifetime after student loans are paid off.

2. If you wait, you may not go: Those who wait may forfeit their degree altogether, which is like throwing away thousands of dollars in the long run after student loans and college expenses.

3. Your 20s matter: The decisions and habits you form as a young person will remain with you for life.

4. You will learn skills that are priceless: The courses, assignments and other college experiences are really going to pay off, regardless of any student debt you may have. Remember, you are paying for these skills.

5. You will grow in extreme ways: In college, you are stretched and pushed outside of your comfort zone in ways that will be life-altering.

6. It will open doors you could never open for yourself: I was required to do an internship during my college years and would’t be where I am today had I not completed higher education. Prior to attending university, I didn’t know how vital the internship programs were, which led me to work for the largest Christian television network in the world.

7. You will make lifelong friends: The people you will meet in college will likely become your best friends along the journey of life. The students who were in my classes at Vanguard University were a different breed of people, insightful, smart and inspiring, and they challenged me to stretch not only my faith, but also my education, and to be the best that I could be. I also attended the wedding of my dear friend from my university and I know I will have a couple friends from that time for life!

8. Investing in yourself and your education is MORE than worth it: If you don’t go to school, what else will you be doing that will be as important? At least if you go to school, you can still simultaneously work and, in fact, you can meet the love of your life and find a career that is suitable for you!

9. If you procrastinate now, what makes you think you will go later? It’s not wrong to go to school later in life—in fact, it’s very commendable—but it’s harder to attend the older you are. Now, if you go in your mid 20’s, that’s not that harsh, but when you are much older, life can be more stressful and/or you may not want to be going from class to class (unless you choose to attend online). Try to go straight out of high school in order to prevent not going at all.

10. The earlier you attend, the more jobs you’ll start to be qualified for, so you won’t miss opportunities: When you wait on furthering your life for the better you are delaying your future. Of course, it’s important to be patient and wait for certain things in life, but when it comes to getting your bachelor’s degree, you do not want to wait. The longer you delay, the more jobs, qualifications and competitive careers you could miss out on.

 

PI Girls, do you think you’ll start college right after high school or do you think it’s good to start later? Is going to college in your mid-20s, late 20s or later in life good or bad? Do you think it even matters when you attend college? Comment below!

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3 Comments

  1. Marcy

    Posted by Marcy on August 17, 2016 at 10:39

    This post makes good points, but it’s a bit of a simplistic way of looking at things and seems to assume that everyone CAN go to college at 18. Several of my friends waited a year or two because they did not have the financial resources to be able to afford it, short of taking out a dangerous amount of debt. I had to wait 3 years due to debilitating health problems. In addition, a large number of people drop out because they are simply not ready for college yet and others have to take five or more years, paying 25% or more tuition than planned, because they were not certain what they wanted to do when they started and changed their major.

    If you can go to college at 18 (financially and emotionally), that’s really good! If you can’t, there’s plenty of things to be gained by waiting. At college, I mainly hang out with older students and I have found that they are generally more focused and driven than their younger peers, have a much clearer idea of what they want out of their investment in college, and make better use of college resources to help them in their career field.

    In addition, those other years aren’t wasted. I wouldn’t trade those three years of my life for anything. On top of getting my health under control (obviously very necessary), I was able to work and save enough money to go to college debt free, volunteer and invest in my church and community, and publish several novels. There is only so much time in life, and there are other things that are worthwhile to invest your time in your late teens and early twenties, too.

    What it comes down to is there are benefits to going right away and benefits to waiting. You just have to find out what is best for you (and possible in your situation).

  2. realmisslq

    Posted by realmisslq on August 15, 2016 at 18:34

    I’m gonna graduate from High School in May or June 2017. I’ll only be 17 years old. I’m planning on taking the rest of the year off to save up for my college tuition, and then going to college in the Fall of 2018. That way, I’ll be 18 when I start, sooo I think it won’t be too bad! ^.^ I doubt my career choice will change; writing is honestly my gift, but I definitely understand this post! ^.^ Sometimes, waiting too long makes you lose the desire – And as we often juggle with different interests in our life, it wouldn’t be hard to not care so much about what we wanted as our major. Great post! 😀

  3. Smylinggirl

    Posted by Smylinggirl on August 15, 2016 at 06:50

    I guess if you don’t have a plan and are just wandering, then delaying college probably isn’t good. However, if you are going to do a gap year experience – like Worldview Academy – that could be a really great thing for you and your faith. If you can get a job that you love right out of high school (either an apprenticeship type gig or paid), why go to college? You already can do what you love.

    I personally am working on an associates but I’m not planning on getting a college degree. I want to be a photographer and I have opportunities to get work experience and learn in the field. The associates is a back up plan in case I need to go to college one day or decide I really want to do some job that requires a degree.

    I also know two guys who started at a local community college after high school but both quit and are working full time. Both are working in fields that will help them with what they love and one has even started a small business.

    Another guy I know about did a trade school 13-month program and has a great job that he loves. His sister said he is basically playing.

    I guess I’m just trying to say that there are lots of options and there is not one right way. No one should ever feel forced to go to college. I would even say that lots of Christi’s reason you should go to college can be accomplished in some of these other options too. To each his own and I wish all of you who are going to college the best of luck!